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10 Food Books to Look for in October

By on October 1, 2013 10:30am EST

Each month, we’re going to take a moment to tell you about some of the great food-related reads that are hitting the shelves,  from cookbooks to kitchen confessions to foodie fiction. There will be a little something for everyone.  Go on, have a taste. 

OCTOBER 1

Cooking ComicallyCooking Comically: Recipes So Easy You’ll Actually Make Them by Tyler Capps 

Cooking should be as much fun as reading a comic book. Recipes should be cheap and easy. And the food has to taste good. That’s where Cooking Comically comes in. Tyler Capps, the creator of recipes like 2 a.m. Chili that took the Internet by storm, offers up simple, tasty meals in a unique illustrated style that will engage all your senses. These dishes are as scrumptious to eat as they are easy to make. This collection includes all-time favorites and original recipes from Cooking Comically, including Sexy Pancakes, Bolognese for Days, Mash-Tatoes, Pulled Pork (aka Operation Man-Kitchen), and Damn Dirty Ape Bread. Perfect for those who can barely boil water but are tired of ramen and fast food. Stop slaving. Start cooking.

Pickles Pigs WhiskeyPickles, Pigs & Whiskey: Recipes from My Three Favorite Food Groups and Then Some by John Currence

Chef John Currence would rather punch you in the mouth with his fantastic flavors than poke you in the eye with fancy presentation. In his first cookbook, Currence gives you 130 recipes organized by 10 different techniques, such as Boiling/Simmering, Slathering, Pickling/Canning, Roasting/Braising, Muddling/Stirring, Brining/Smoking, and Baking/Spinning, just to name a few. John’s fun-loving personality rings true throughout the book with his personal stories and history, and his one-of-a-kind recipes for Pickled Sweet Potatoes, Whole Grain Guinness Mustard, Deep South “Ramen” with a Fried Poached Egg, Rabbit Cacciatore, Smoked Endive, Fire-Roasted Cauliflower, and Kitchen Sink Cookie Ice Cream Sandwiches. Each recipe has a song pairing with it and the complete list can be downloaded at spotify.com. Over 100 documentary-style color photographs by photographer Angie Mosier complete this stunning look at the South.

The Complete Nose to TailThe Complete Nose to Tail by Fergus Henderson 

A conscientious and resourceful chef who lives by the motto “Nose to Tail,” Henderson advocates using everything that is possibly edible of fowl, beast, and fish, creating dishes that fuse high sophistication with a strong tradition of rustic thriftiness. “It would be disingenuous to the animal not to make the most of the whole beast,” Henderson explains. “There is a set of delights, textural and flavoursome, which lie beyond the fillet.”

The Complete Nose to Tail presents Henderson’s complete culinary oevre: recipes that offer a unique and delicious eating experience. Both refined and curious eaters can enjoy a taste of the wild side with such dishes as Pig’s Trotter Stuffed with Potato, Rabbit Wrapped in Fennel and Bacon, and Roast Bone Marrow and Parsley Salad, as well as sumptuous familiar fare, including Deviled Crab; Smoked Haddock, Mustard, and Saffron; and Green Beans, Shallots, Garlic, and Anchovies. There are desserts, too: sublime puddings, such as the St. John Eccles Cakes, and the timeless favorite Chocolate Ice Cream

OCTOBER 8 

Joy of KosherJoy of Kosher:  Fast, Fresh Family Recipes by Jamie Geller 

Raised on takeout in a non-Kosher family, Jamie Geller was clueless about cooking when she married into her hubby’s large, traditional Jewish family. Dubbed “the bride who knew nothing,” she was determined to show them that she had what it takes to fit in with a brood of caterers whose recipes have been handed down for generations. But Jamie didn’t just learn how to cook. She “sprinted into cookbooks, magazines, a website, and a TV show,” earning the title The Queen of Kosher. In The Joy of Kosher, this culinary media juggernaut, wife, and mother of five welcomes us into her life, sharing stories of her struggles in the kitchen, her triumph in overcoming the little voice inside that says, “I can’t,” and her joy at hearing the highest praise of all: “More, please mommy.”

OCTOBER 15

A Century of RestaurantsA Century of Restaurants by Rick Browne 

Come along on a pilgrimage to some of the oldest and most historic restaurants in America in A Century of Restaurants. Each is special not only because of its longevity but also for its historic significance, interesting stories, and, of course, its wonderful food. The oldest Japanese restaurant in the country is profiled, along with stagecoach stops, elegant eateries, barbecue joints, hamburger shops, cafes, bars and grills, and two dueling restaurants that both claim to have invented the French dip sandwich.Some are as many as 300 years old. Each profile contains a famous recipe, the history of the restaurant, a look at the restaurant today, mouthwatering descriptions of some of its signature dishes, fun facts that make each place unique, and hundreds of beautiful photos that capture the spirit of each establishment. It’s everything you need for an armchair tour of 100 historic restaurants that have made America great.

Luscious LiquersLuscious Liqueurs: 50 Make-at-Home Infusions to Sip and Savor by A. J. Rathbun

Liqueurs-infusions that meld liquor with fruits, herbs, and spices-are once again an “it” beverage. In Luscious Liqueurs: 50 Recipes for Sublime and Spirited Infusions to Sip and Savor, mixologist A.J. Rathbun shows readers how easy and fun it is to make their favorite liqueurs at home. An informative introduction demystifies the process of preparing homemade liqueurs and explains how to set up an efficient (and fun!) “liqueur laboratory.” With just a few fresh ingredients and A.J.’s expert guidance, liqueur lovers will be whipping up batches of sweet, spicy, fruity, and exotic mixtures that cost less and taste better than any store-bought bottle. Recipes include Righteous Raspberry, Limoncello, Cinnamon Snap, Heroic Hazelnut, Scotch Treat, Irish Cream, Anisetter, Mandarino, and 42 other tempting liqueurs photographed in stylish full color.

OCTOBER 22

The Snacking DeadThe Snacking Dead: A Parody in a Cookbook by D. B. Walker

The Snacking Dead is a parody in a cookbook. With 50 recipes (that use supermarket ingredients and what’s on hand) for finger food-from light to hearty-plus a prepper-approved pantry list, tips for “getting it together” and being resourceful, it also tells the love/survival story of everymom Pam and her backwoods hunk, Daryl.Throughout, the reader will find photography that makes food look delicious yet that mimicks the blown-out visual look of The Walking Dead.

 

 

Guide to Urban MoonshiningThe Kings County Distillery Guide to Urban Moonshining: How to Make and Drink Whiskey by David Haskell, Colin Spoelman

A new generation of urban bootleggers is distilling whiskey at home, and cocktail enthusiasts have embraced the nuances of brown liquors. Written by the founders of Kings County Distillery, New York City’s first distillery since Prohibition, this spirited illustrated book explores America’s age-old love affair with whiskey. It begins with chapters on whiskey’s history and culture from 1640 to today, when the DIY trend and the classic cocktail craze have conspired to make it the next big thing. For those thirsty for practical information, the book next provides a detailed, easy-to-follow guide to safe home distilling, complete with a list of supplies, step-by-step instructions, and helpful pictures, anecdotes, and tips. The final section focuses on the contemporary whiskey scene, featuring a list of microdistillers, cocktail and food recipes from the country’s hottest mixologists and chefs, and an opinionated guide to building your own whiskey collection.

OCTOBER 29

Food Rules An Eater's ManualFood Rules: An Eater’s Manual by Michael Pollan, Illustrated by Maira Kalman 

Michael Pollan’s Food Rules prompted a national discussion helping to change the way Americans approach eating. This new edition illustrated by celebrated artist Maira Kalman—and expanded with a new introduction and nineteen additional food rules—marks an advance in the national dialogue that Food Rules inspired. Many of the new rules, suggested by readers, underscore the central teachings of the original Food Rules, which are that eating doesn’t have to be so complicated and that food is as much about pleasure and community as it is about nutrition and health. A beautiful book to cherish and share, Food Rules guides us with humor, joy, and common sense toward a happier, healthier relationship to food.

Great Balls of CheeseGreat Balls of Cheese by Michelle Buffard

Remember the nut-covered, pink-colored cheese balls served at grandma’s house for the holidays? Well, these are not your grandma’s cheese balls. Updated for contemporary tastes, Michelle Buffardi’s cheese balls come in both savory and sweet flavors, like cheddar, blue cheese, and Buffalo wing sauce, or Bing cherry, rum, and pecan. And cheese balls are just part of the story. Many of the recipes, photographed in gorgeous full color, are in adorable shapes for all kinds of occasions, such as an Easter egg, Thanksgiving turkey, Christmas ornament, or a football for a Super Bowl party. Other designs are just plain fun, like the Nacho Cat, a Wise and Cheesy Owl, or one that looks like a pizza fresh from the oven. There is so much interest in bringing old-fashioned foods back into style, and this is no exception. Perfect for food lovers with crafty flair or anyone who loves to entertain, this book, with more than fifty inventive recipes and designs, is sure to be turned to again and again.

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Cassandra Neace

Cassandra Neace is a freelance writer living in Houston, Texas, and a contributing editor for Book Riot. She can often be found with a book in one hand and a craft cocktail in the other. Follow her on Twitter: @CassandraNeace

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  • Wini Moranville

    All right. The cheese book. . WhY DIDN”T I THINK OF THAT? Who doesn’t love cheese balls?